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Looking for Jobs in the North East? A list of Hundreds of Employers Recruiting in the Area

A list of around 1,000 companies with vacancies in the Yorkshire, Tyneside, Teesside / Tees Valley, Northumberland and Leeds areas.

The list is split into two tables: the first contains charities, education and public sector organisations. The second table lists private sector companies.

Where given, company sizes are measured by the number of people they employ. This figure usually includes all employees of the company, or parent company - not just those employed in the North East.

A few companies are listed but carry no links - these are organisations that I estimate should have a significant recruitment effort (based on turnover and number of employees), but I can find no website or recruitment link on their website.

Other useful local company lists include Newcastle City Council's Business Directory, The NEPIC Directory, Yell, Free Index and Endole.

The linked websites are checked regularly for phishing, viruses and malware and any infected links are removed when found. Companies who only offer low-quality jobs such as unpaid internships, commission-only sales or work-at-home piecework will not be included. Minimum company size is generally 50+ employees and £1M+ turnover, however exceptions are made where future expansion seems likely or where the company works in an area where jobs are scarce in the North East.

The list is not exhaustive. Suggestions for new additions or corrections are welcome.

Unfortunately, many of the websites linked to below require Javascript enabled to function correctly.



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Subtle Press and Media Bullying via Subtext: A Spin Doctor's Kid

Was one of Tony Blair's children actually fathered by a New Labour spin doctor?

One of the common tricks that the media appear to get up to is putting different headlines together to make a suggestion (follow the link to the original page, or scroll down to view a screenshot). In this case, the headline, “Blairs' surprise over baby” is butted up against “Conceived by a spin doctor?”

All things considered, I'd guess this suggestion isn't true and isn't serious bullying. As far as I know New Labour weren't particularly hostile to the BBC in 1999, that being only two years after their big victory in 1997, and long before what looked like serious political warfare between New Labour and the media around the time of the Iraq War.

If this is anything, it's probably just a bit of silly joshing from the politics journos. It might not even be that – it might just be a coincidence that those two headlines ended up like that. I sometimes look at the pictures and links to other pieces that appear below each of my articles and notice that the choice doesn't seem random. And yet it is. With one brief exception some time ago, and some of the links that appear in the 'National View' section, the related content sections are all still operating in random mode, choosing from other articles related by subject. I've always tended to shy away from deliberately using subtext at all, if only because other people are so much better at it than me.

However, it still makes for a nice, basic example of one of the ways the press can psychologically pick away at someone and get away with it.



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The orange car has deployed a 16-valve engine configuration for this occasion that we've come to expect from their manufacturers - large pistons in a V8 configuration. The huge cubic capacity of this engine, combined with the symmetrically balanced layout of the pistons helps to give that amazing engine note and low-down torque that we're all so familiar with. In a radical move, they've opted for a suspension technology they're calling "leaf-spring", which they tell me completely removes the need for dampeners.

The grey car, on the other hand, has deployed an incredible 5-speed synchromeshed transmission system. Drivers have told me that the gear change is short-throw and very positive. Perhaps less exciting was their decision to stick with a familiar braking technology - drum brakes, rather than disc brakes. Sources close to the manufacturer claim this will definitely pay off in terms of higher speeds.

The blue car's manufacturers have been stressing the benefits of achieving a better power-to-weight ratio, and have managed to lighten their car by building the body of the vehicle out of plastic. They have also fitted the front and rear with a downforce-reducing technology they are calling "inverse spoilers". The manufacturers say this will significantly reduce the amount of weight on the road and "you'll see some serious performances at speeds over 80MPH".

And that brings my commentary on this event to an end.


Imagine if that was the radio commentary on a car race, and that the entire commentary for the duration of the race was like that.

This is the problem I have with a lot of economics journalism - and quite a few other types of journalism, too. The above 'commentary' may be interesting for people who know about cars (and the jokes might amuse), but surely even the biggest petrol head wants an occasional update on who's winning and which car is the fastest (or corners best, or even which is least likely to kill the driver). I'm not claiming that any of this is a brilliant metaphor for the current economic situation, of course.

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